Tuesday, 24 May 2016

Could a portfolio career be right for you?


Imagine a career which has a purpose and uses your skills and interests.

Imagine fulfilling your desire to become self-employed, alongside part-time employment to reduce the risk of going it alone.

Imagine being able to build a career around your family life.

The portfolio career

The way we work is changing. A job is no longer for life.  The increase in choice and variety in the job market together with the increase of part time and contract roles allows for individuals to be more creative and flexible when designing their career path.  

We are starting to recognise that each individual has a variety of skills and interests that can suit more than one role.  We are also starting to accept that an individual may have more than one job and move between jobs more frequently to enable them to rise up the career ladder, earn more money as well as to find a career that suits them and makes them happy.

The portfolio career fits into this new way of working really well.  It has many parts to it and involves an individual having two or more jobs at any one time.  The advantage of creating a portfolio career is that it can enable you to form a career to suit you.  You will be available for opportunities to fulfil different skills and interests whilst being in control of how your career balances with your lifestyle.

Is a portfolio career for you?

Since mentioning how a portfolio career could be an option for Mums returning to work in my blog ‘Mums returning to work – ‘how to achieve your desired career’, I have received numerous enquiries from those who are intrigued to find out how this could work for them.  To assist your thinking, here is an example of a portfolio career:

Jane is self-employed as a private tutor, having previously worked as a full time teacher.  She also works in an employed position as a garden guide to fulfil her love of the outdoors and interest in sharing knowledge with others using skills developed whilst teaching.  In her spare time, she is starting to write a book on garden design, something she has always wanted to do but has never found the time.

Is your mind now buzzing with ideas of what you would like to achieve?

What would a portfolio career be like for you?

If you wish to explore this further, start putting together your ideas of what a portfolio career would look like for you.  Understand your finances so that you know what you can afford to do.  Talk to people and find out what opportunities are available and to help you confirm that this is the right route for you. To maintain a portfolio career, it is important that you are able to talk to people and network. Finally, put your plan together to make it all happen and plan your time wisely so that you take on a manageable amount of work!

 If a career with purpose and flexibility sounds appealing, then perhaps the portfolio career is for you. 

Tuesday, 3 May 2016

How to spend less time working

We would all like to work less, wouldn’t we?  No one approaches me for help because they would like to work more.  Most people are wanting to work less because they are feeling tired and stressed and are not enjoying life.  They are often working more than their contracted hours simply to 'get the job done'.

The question is, how many hours should we be working each week? 

Recent research in Australia has suggested that those who work about 25 hours per week had the best cognitive function and for those working more than 40 hours per week there is a rapid decline.  The research was only carried out on over-40s but perhaps there is a possibility it could apply to all workers? 

However, even if you had the option to work less, would you take a pay cut for it?  That is a tricky one.  Not many people are in a position to take a pay cut so how about focusing instead on making the hours you do work more productive so you can spend less time working overtime and more time enjoying life.
 
It is all about achieving the best work-life balance for you and the best place to start is by taking small steps to help shorten your working day.

Can you delegate or ask for help more often? Can you turn off your work phone outside of work?  How often do you ask for help?  Can you manage your day in a more productive way? 

These are just a few things to think about to help you achieve the work-life balance you desire.  I know it can be difficult but some small alterations to your working day may make all the difference and enable you to leave work on time.

For more ways to achieve a work-life balance, have a read of my factsheet here.
 
www.tessaarmstrong.co.uk